Math Placement Criteria Grade 8 to Grade 9

The purpose of this page is to acquaint you with the instruments used in math placement from grade eight to grade nine and to provide you with the ranges we use as guidelines. Math placement is not something that happens at the end of the year. Rather, it is an ongoing process with specific milestones throughout the year. The math department also feels it is important to include a general description of each CCHS course.

CCHS LEVEL DESCRIPTIONS

There are four levels in mathematics at CCHS designed to meet the different learning styles of students. To a large extent, the curriculum and the order in which the topics are taught are consistent across each of the four levels of a particular subject area. The major differences among the levels are the way in which new content is presented, the pacing of the course, and the amount of review of previously learned topics. Below are more detailed descriptions of each level.

Honors Geometry: This level is designed for students who have demonstrated the highest level of proficiency with non-routine, abstract and challenging math concepts. Students have well-developed, independent, and productive work habits.  Students consistently demonstrate mastery of previously learned topics and retain learning without re-teaching. Students learn new topics at an accelerated pace with minimal repetition and can readily apply and synthesize concepts to solve novel problems (including in testing situations).

Enriched Geometry: This is an enriched level designed for students who have demonstrated a high level of proficiency with abstract and challenging math concepts.  Students have developed productive work habits, can demonstrate mastery of previously learned topics, and retain learning with limited re-teaching and review.  Students learn new topics at a fast pace with some repetition. With practice, students can apply and synthesize concepts to solve some novel problems (including in testing situations).

Integrated Math A:  This level incorporates a sequence of three courses, each of which includes algebra, geometry, statistics and trigonometry standards. The theory underlying this approach is that, in the real world, problems do not come labeled requiring a specific approach.  By using an “integrated” approach, students can decide what skills to use to solve a particular problem, no matter what the content area. Students have mastery of some previously learned topics, and retain learning with re-teaching and review. Students will learn how to use a combination of skills from algebra, geometry, statistics, and trigonometry depending on their analysis and approach to solving problems.  This level is taught at a moderate pace with sufficient repetition.

Integrated Math B:  This level incorporates a sequence of three courses, each of which includes algebra, geometry, statistics and trigonometry standards.  The integrated approach used in this level will enable students to problem solve using different strategies. Students will draw on previously learned material and develop new skills at a pace that provides significant time for conceptual understanding.  Students will learn how to use a combination of skills from algebra, geometry, statistics, and trigonometry depending on their analysis and approach to solving problems.

Note: Arrows indicate typical paths through the Mathematics sequence and do not preclude other movement between levels.

 

Five Instruments Used by CMS to Determine Placement

IOWA Algebra Prognosis Test – taken in directed classes only, weighted once

The IOWA Algebra Prognosis Test is a 63 question multiple choice test which assesses algebra readiness skills. Calculators are not allowed. The four part test takes about 40 minutes and is given in late March.

Orleans Hanna Geometry Prognosis Test – taken in guided and independent classes only, weighted once

Given in January, the Orleans Hanna Geometry Prognosis Test is a 40 question multiple choice test which assesses geometry readiness. Calculators are not allowed

Test Average, weighted once

The test averages for each term are considered as well as the overall test average. Calculators are allowed on most tests.

Midyear Exam, weighted once

The midyear exam includes material covered in the first half of the year. It is usually given the week prior to February vacation.

American Mathematics Competition (AMC8): weighted once

This 25 question multiple choice test is given in November or early December during a 40 minute class period. Calculators are allowed. The items cover computation, geometry, interpreting graphs and problem solving.

National Mathematics League Contests (NML): weighted one-half

The contests require students to apply algebraic concepts which they have learned. Some questions are fairly direct applications while other require some integration of knowledge. The six question contest is given in January. No Calculators are allowed. The chart below provides the benchmarks used to place students in the ninth grade. Since no placement instrument is perfect, there are some overlaps int eh ranges to allow teachers some flexibility for individual differences and special circumstances.

*To receive an Honors Geometry Placement, at least one of either Test Average or Midyear scores must meet criteria for that class. Please note that Test Averages are based on the averages of actual assessments, not the grade from report cards which are adjusted for homework activity.